Where Are They Now?

Our Graduates are Making a Difference

Ten years ago, Valentino Achak Deng and Dave Eggers founded the Marial Bai Secondary School to provide an exceptional education to the girls and boys of rural South Sudan. Since then, the school has become ranked one of the best schools in the country. Our students consistently score in the top percentile on the national exams. Marial Bai Secondary School is so successful that the South Sudanese government recently granted us a new, additional campus that we plan to open as the Alok Girls’ Academy, an all-girls boarding school. With your support, we are continuing to make a difference by offering peace through education in South Sudan. 


Meet Our Students

MARY ABUK KUUR BOL COMMUNITY MOBILIZER Mary was expected to quit school and get married after primary school. But when she saw her brother flourish at Marial Bai Secondary School, she decided that she wanted to go to high school before getting married. Mary did just that and joined the freshman class in 2011.       She fondly remembers playing basketball, reading in the library, and nightly study sessions under the school’s solar powered light bulbs. She remembers the diversity of the student body—it was the first time in her life that she was able to live with and befriend South Sudanese of different tribes.      After graduating, she got a job at Concern Worldwide, where she is currently a Community Mobilizer. Mary works with farming communities on ways to improve their increase food security. Mary is now married with two children and is the primary income earner in her family. 

MARY ABUK KUUR BOL
COMMUNITY MOBILIZER

Mary was expected to quit school and get married after primary school. But when she saw her brother flourish at Marial Bai Secondary School, she decided that she wanted to go to high school before getting married. Mary did just that and joined the freshman class in 2011. 
     She fondly remembers playing basketball, reading in the library, and nightly study sessions under the school’s solar powered light bulbs. She remembers the diversity of the student body—it was the first time in her life that she was able to live with and befriend South Sudanese of different tribes. 
    After graduating, she got a job at Concern Worldwide, where she is currently a Community Mobilizer. Mary works with farming communities on ways to improve their increase food security. Mary is now married with two children and is the primary income earner in her family. 


A NOTE FROM VALENTINO & DAVE South Sudan continues to face significant challenges. Since achieving independence from Sudan in 2011, the world’s newest country has suffered years of intermittent civil war and famine. But even in these dire times, young people go to extraordinary lengths to be educated. They, and we, see education as the only path out of the relentless cycle of civil war.    The Valentino Achak Deng Foundation is independent of the government of South Sudan, so even when the government cannot fund the country’s public schools, the Marial Bai Secondary School — consistently ranked among the best in South Sudan — can continue to operate. Your support makes this independence possible. And your support makes possible a new generation of well-educated young people with valuable diplomas.    Because South Sudan is a new country with a very low literacy rate, any high school graduate is sought-after for employment. Our graduates find work in international NGOs, healthcare nonprofits, the government of South Sudan, and as teachers themselves. Traditionally in South Sudan, many elementary school teachers are themselves recent graduates of secondary school.     Because the Marial Bai Secondary School is recognized as the one of the country’s best independent secondary schools, the government of South Sudan recently granted the VAD Foundation an entire campus, already built and ready to be populated with students. It had been constructed by another NGO, which could not operate it. Instead of allowing it to lay dormant, the VAD Foundation will, in 2018, transform it into the Alok Girls’ Academy, a boarding school for up to 144 young South Sudanese women.     There is no greater challenge, and no greater responsibility, than to make sure young women in South Sudan are able to pursue their educations without the pressure of domestic responsibilities and early marriage. With your help, we will make sure more and more young women achieve higher education and can then transform society in South Sudan. This is all possible thanks to your support.  We are truly grateful. 

A NOTE FROM VALENTINO & DAVE

South Sudan continues to face significant challenges. Since achieving independence from Sudan in 2011, the world’s newest country has suffered years of intermittent civil war and famine. But even in these dire times, young people go to extraordinary lengths to be educated. They, and we, see education as the only path out of the relentless cycle of civil war.
   The Valentino Achak Deng Foundation is independent of the government of South Sudan, so even when the government cannot fund the country’s public schools, the Marial Bai Secondary School — consistently ranked among the best in South Sudan — can continue to operate. Your support makes this independence possible. And your support makes possible a new generation of well-educated young people with valuable diplomas.
   Because South Sudan is a new country with a very low literacy rate, any high school graduate is sought-after for employment. Our graduates find work in international NGOs, healthcare nonprofits, the government of South Sudan, and as teachers themselves. Traditionally in South Sudan, many elementary school teachers are themselves recent graduates of secondary school. 
   Because the Marial Bai Secondary School is recognized as the one of the country’s best independent secondary schools, the government of South Sudan recently granted the VAD Foundation an entire campus, already built and ready to be populated with students. It had been constructed by another NGO, which could not operate it. Instead of allowing it to lay dormant, the VAD Foundation will, in 2018, transform it into the Alok Girls’ Academy, a boarding school for up to 144 young South Sudanese women. 
   There is no greater challenge, and no greater responsibility, than to make sure young women in South Sudan are able to pursue their educations without the pressure of domestic responsibilities and early marriage. With your help, we will make sure more and more young women achieve higher education and can then transform society in South Sudan.

This is all possible thanks to your support. 
We are truly grateful. 


What's New in 2018

ALOK GIRLS’ ACADEMY
In February 2018, we aim to open our second campus, a boarding school for girls called the Alok Girls’ Academy.  Currently in South Sudan, less than 1% of young women finish high school. We chose the boarding school model to provide a safe and supportive environment where the girls can focus on their studies. The campus will be free from the distractions and demands of their lives at home, allowing the students to complete their studies and be deterred from early marriage. With your help, in February of 2018, we will open the school to 144 girls.

VOCATIONAL TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES
Our comprehensive curriculum creates real-world experiences for our students. Chemistry class leads to business development and economic independence as our students learn how to make and then sell chalk, soap, and honey products. We are exploring ways to expand our vocational training opportunities for our students and our graduates.

COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS
Our students get the best possible education available in South Sudan. However, very few have the means to pay for college. We are now developing an endowment and a college placement program to better ensure that our high achieving students have a place in higher education. 

SUSTAINABILITY
Our students study by solar power and learn sustainable farming techniques to improve food security at the school and within their communities.


Where We Are Going 

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PROJECTS WE’RE FUNDRAISING FOR
Alok Girls’ Academy — $150,000
T
he government of South Sudan granted us a campus that we are transforming into a boarding school for 144 girls. Your support will help outfit the kitchen, build the teachers’ residences, and provide the students with bunk beds, mattresses, and school supplies.
Marial Bai Secondary School Renovations — $20,000
Help us repair the roof of our main campus.
Campus Supply Vehicle — $25,000
Help us minimize challenges around transportation costs by providing a vehicle that will support both our campuses. This vehicle will ensure that each school has the supplies it needs in addition to transporting staff and students when necessary..

EVERY DONATION HELPS
$5,000 can pay one teacher’s salary for an entire year.
$500 can send a girl to school for an entire year.
$75 can provide one set of science laboratory equipment.
$50 can provide one student’s textbook and school supplies for a year. 

HOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE
Donate — every penny counts!
Volunteer — as a small non-profit with a small staff, we have ongoing needs that could benefit from your assistance.
Connect us with universities that can provide scholarships for our most promising students.
Host a house party, dinner at your favorite restaurant, or read What Is the What and include a fundraiser as part of your book club.

Update from our U.S. Director - May 2017

Dear Supporters,

I will be taking my first trip to East Africa this June and July. it will a strategic trip that is meant to make new business ties with organizations that want to partner and grow with us as we expand our work in vocational education, girls’ education and university scholarships for our MBSS graduates. 

  • Zawadi Education, which provides scholarships to gifted African secondary school girl graduates.

  • Andela, which provides a prestigious vocational training course to Africa’s best and brightest software programmers.

  • FilmAid Kenya, which works with youth in Kakuma Refugee Camp and other groups to provide arts and film training. For example, they are known for their campaign to bring refugee stories to the global public through their #teamrefugees campaign.

  • BRCK, which provides appropriate hardware technology for remote learners, including tablets that allow school children to learn even if their teacher is absent and there is limited electricity.

  • Xavier Project, which teaches multimedia literacy to South Sudanese refugees living in Nairobi.

In South Sudan, I will follow-up with NGOs that are potential partners such as Norwegian Refugee Council, Concern WorldwideUSAID VISTASGirls' Education South Sudan; University of Juba, UN Mission in South Sudan including UNICEF and World Food Program.

As a development professional with over seven years of field experience, I will also perform key programmatic tasks, such as:

1) Map out the stakeholders in South Sudan's education industry and the performance of their projects, meet with them and understand how decision making is made in these donor and implementation organizations, get a sense of their outlook for the next year or two in South Sudan.

2) In Aweil, research for designing the South Sudan Employment Initiative, get a sense of what buildings are available, what other NGOs are doing in the TVET (technical vocational education and training) and working with out-of-school youth to give them economic opportunities.

3) Strategic planning with field staff.

4) Collect stories from the students, teachers and members of the local community.

5) Meet with alumni from last year’s class and other alumni from previous years.

6) Collect other information required for grants and major donors.

If you're interested in arranging a personal presentation after I return in late July, please email me at yvonne@vadfoundation.org.

Sincerely,

Yvonne Chen (M.A. International Development Studies)

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A Visit to South Sudan

Our U.S. Director Yvonne Chen visited South Sudan for the first time in June. Here is her report:

The plane dips suddenly and Valentino points to the left. I look down over a sprawling town of one story buildings, corrugated iron roofs of reds, blues and greens. There are few tarmac roads. Sliced across the center of this sprawl is a mountain that shoots from the horizon. We arrive in Juba, the capital. 

As I step off the plane, I am fearful in this country in the midst of famine and "on the brink of genocide." Last July, hundreds of troops from Riek Machar's armed opposition descended that mountain with the intention of overthrowing the five-year-old government.  Over 300 young men died. It was one more battle in the unending war here.

 

A view of Juba from the plane

A view of Juba from the plane

A merchant in Juba 

A merchant in Juba 

Inflation is so astronomical that one has to carry around stacks of bills in order to buty the necessities. The exchange rate is about 130 pounds: 1 USD whereas 10 years ago it was just 3:1. The devaluation of the currency has led to large-scale economic hardship across the country, so that even places where there is not conflict you see people fleeing to refugee camps to ensure they can get food. In the former Northern Bahr el Ghazal, some villages see half their population decimated because poorer families flee to Sudan. 

Valentino (far left) and Yvonne (middle) with several MBSS alumni

Valentino (far left) and Yvonne (middle) with several MBSS alumni

After meeting with Africa Education Trust (AET), I learned that there is a monthly coordinating meeting among all of the education NGOs. These "education cluster" meetings are held each month at the Ministry of Education. Together these NGOs implement education programs that reach thousands of students across South Sudan. One of the programs that was discussed today was a new 3-year European Union project (IMPACT) that will supplement teachers' incomes conditional upon their attendance. Teacher absenteeism is one of the biggest problems contributing to the low quality of education and learning outcomes in South Sudan. It has been made worse with the currency inflation affecting teacher salaries and delayed salary payments from the government.

The Bureau for Cultural and Educational Affairs in the State Department had introduced us to the EducationUSA officer in Juba last October. So Valentino and I visited the American Corner located in the University of Juba's library. The Corner, like EductionUSA offices across America's embassies around the world, serves as a resource center for students who wish to study in America and is run by the US Embassy's Cultural Affairs Officer, Joseph Mike. Students come here to study for their SATs and TOEFL and get advice on applying to universities. Everyday there is a cue of at least 20 college students, most waiting to use the computers to access the internet. There are even professors that use the computer here. Internet, let alone free internet, is such a scarce resource in South Sudan. 

Yvonne and Valentino at the American Corner at the University of Juba 

Yvonne and Valentino at the American Corner at the University of Juba 

At our hotel in Juba, we hosted a small gathering of MBSS alumni living in Juba. I had the opportunity to meet them, hear their stories and make some short videos. 

Not everyone was a graduate of MBSS but they were all able to finish their high school education, some of them in Juba. In Aweil, I met some alumni who were studying to be nurses, midwives and clinicians at Aweil Health Sciences Institute. Everyone is doing very well; many are in diploma programs or in university. A running theme: our alumni would not be where they are today if it were not for their education at MBSS. Having Kenyan and Ugandan teachers who only spoke English as well as a library and a science lab were game changers  many of our alumni. 

In Nyamlel, on our way back from Marial Bai, I caught up with two of our female alumni: Monica Adeng and Mary Abuk Kur. Both are now 21 years old, married, and Abuk is also a new mother. Monica and Abuk were close friends at school and are now colleagues at Concern Worldwide, an NGO in Aweil West County. They make about $500 per month, meaning they are the primary breadwinners in their households.  

The two women have been working as field officers on farmer and nutrition issues since 2015. Abuk and Monica support their families with the money they earn at their NGO jobs. They are considered to be role models in their communities. Girls aspire to finish school and get a well-paying job. I learned that many of our alumni work at NGOs that include Norwegian Refugee Council, Doctors Without Borders (MSF), USAID VISTAS project, Samaritan Purse and Premier. The NGOs view MBSS as a school that produces well-educated people fluent in English. 

In Aweil, we were also able to meet with USAID VISTAS, which we have asked for an in-kind grant for renovations of our vocational training center to be located at the Marial Bai Secondary School. Part of the school grounds will be converted to workshops for up to 200 out-of-school youth to learn business, vocational and life skills. We hope to get the construction materials in October, and train and renovate the first group of carpentry and masonry students between November and February.

Norwegian Refugee Council's (NRC) Youth Program Officer and I discussed how to partner on our proposed vocational training center, which we call the South Sudan Employment Initiative. Norwegian Refugee Council will share their YEP (Youth Economic Package) model that has been successful in IDP (internally displaced people), returnee and refugee communities in Kenya and South Sudan. In addition, NRC will provide scholastic materials for theoretical learning as well as ongoing monitoring and evaluation, and financial and administrative support for donor reporting. The VAD Foundation will contribute the numeracy and literacy training, vocational training equipment and buildings for the project. We continue to seek grant funding for the vocational training center, which has an ambitious fundraising goal of $350,000. We have already raised $70,000 of the total required to launch, but plans had stalled because of the exorbitant price of materials.

On my way back to Juba, I met with US Embassy staff, including USAID officers who manage the conflict mitigation project called USAID VISTAS. They share our belief that vocational training and girl's education are critical, but they were also honest about donors' wariness when it comes to investing in South Sudan's long term development. 

Back in Nairobi, Valentino and I visited Andela, a social enterprise that provides prestigious software development training. Valentino also spoke to the young people about the Foundation's work and responded to their questions. We will be posting some of these videos on our social media. Stay tuned for his inspirational words to Africa's brightest software programmers.

Valentino speaking to the youth at Andela's offices in Nairobi. 

Valentino speaking to the youth at Andela's offices in Nairobi. 

Some of the kids from Andela's program with Yvonne and Valentino 

Some of the kids from Andela's program with Yvonne and Valentino 

I also visited Xavier Project's education hub, a non-formal education center in a refugee neighborhood outside of Nairobi and its Tamuka adult learning center. Xavier Project, along with American Center, is referring talented South Sudanese high school graduates to our pool of nominees for the MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program. To learn more about this new scholarship opportunity for our MBSS alumni and other South Sudanese refugees, visit our new scholarships page.

The Hilde Back Educational Fund is a Nairobi-based organization that is remarkably similar to ours. While they do not directly manage a school, they have a huge impact on the lives of poor people through a scholarship fund targeted at talented low-income high school students in Kenya. This year sponsors from around the world funded 56 Form 1 students (high school freshmen). Many sponsors learned about them through the HBO documentary "A Small Act" which tells the story of a life changed by sponsorship. 

Students' scores are sent to their sponsors at the end of every semester (three times a year), and sponsors also receive a personalized letter from their sponsored students. Students also meet with their advisers in-person during school breaks and take part in special enrichment activities. 

Many of our MBSS students have not had the opportunity to go on to college, in particular girls, who culturally and historically have been denied educational opportunities. In response we are now starting a sponsorship program for our talented alumni to attend either a four-year program at the University of Juba or a three-year health sciences diploma program. 

Supporters will have two options: to donate the full $6,000 required to put a student through a degree program or to contribute to our interest bearing Public Service Endowment Fund. To read more about our new scholarships for MBSS graduates, please visit www.vadfoundation.org/scholarships. We envision that, like Hilde Back sponsors, our sponsors will have the opportunity to develop a sponsor relationship with their university student, receiving tangible evidence of their student's progress.

In Nairobi, I also met with FilmAid InternationalWindle Trust KenyaZawadi Africa Educational Fund and Akili Dada.We hope to collaborate with these organizations. I look forward to developing those relationships when I return to Africa in October. 

A Visit to Kakuma Refugee Camp

Kenya's Kakuma Refugee Camp welcomed Valentino with open arms during his visit in February, 2017. Over 20,000 additional South Sudanese refugees will call this place home this year, as a new section of the camp is being developed specifically for the newcomers fleeing the turmoil in South Sudan. Valentino closely documented his visit to his former home, which was hosted by Lutheran World Federation, a NGO that provides art and sports activities to camp youth.   

Kenya's Kakuma Refugee Camp welcomed Valentino with open arms during his visit in February, 2017. Over 20,000 additional South Sudanese refugees will call this place home this year, as a new section of the camp is being developed specifically for the newcomers fleeing the turmoil in South Sudan. Valentino closely documented his visit to his former home, which was hosted by Lutheran World Federation, a NGO that provides art and sports activities to camp youth. 
 

Valentino was invited to Kakuma by Lutheran World Federation (LWF). They knew about Valentino's advocacy for universal education, especially in East Africa, and they knew about the VAD Foundation's school in Marial Bai. They thought Valentino would be a great advocate for the Camp. Valentino was curious about what the camp was like so many years after he visited. He had not been back for more than a decade, when he visited with Dave Eggers to research What Is The What in 2003. (Above: Valentino and LWF staff Mr. Collins and Ms. Chegge.)  

Valentino was invited to Kakuma by Lutheran World Federation (LWF). They knew about Valentino's advocacy for universal education, especially in East Africa, and they knew about the VAD Foundation's school in Marial Bai. They thought Valentino would be a great advocate for the Camp. Valentino was curious about what the camp was like so many years after he visited. He had not been back for more than a decade, when he visited with Dave Eggers to research What Is The What in 2003. (Above: Valentino and LWF staff Mr. Collins and Ms. Chegge.)
 

Valentino wanted to see what had changed since he left. And once he arrived, he also felt that he could help. He scoped out areas where the VAD Foundation could support youth at the Camp, in particular girls who want to continue their education. He visited the Angelina Jolie Secondary Boarding School for girls (shown above) and had an idea:  

Valentino wanted to see what had changed since he left. And once he arrived, he also felt that he could help. He scoped out areas where the VAD Foundation could support youth at the Camp, in particular girls who want to continue their education. He visited the Angelina Jolie Secondary Boarding School for girls (shown above) and had an idea:
 

"I think we may find that we can make a dollar go a long way by supporting the educational aspirations of some of the South Sudanese youth in the Camp-- who've earned good grades but lack the money to go to college," said Valentino. (Above: Valentino at the Angelina Jolie Girls Secondary Boarding School.)

"I think we may find that we can make a dollar go a long way by supporting the educational aspirations of some of the South Sudanese youth in the Camp-- who've earned good grades but lack the money to go to college," said Valentino. (Above: Valentino at the Angelina Jolie Girls Secondary Boarding School.)

Visiting the camp was a chance for Valentino to reconnect with old friends who never left the camp, and to see what has changed since he left. Today the camp continues to help refugees, to provide support programs meant to help unaccompanied minors and women and people of all ages who’ve been traumatized by war and famine. Educational programs have improved significantly since Valentino was a refugee here 16 years ago. (Above: Entrance to the Camp.)

Visiting the camp was a chance for Valentino to reconnect with old friends who never left the camp, and to see what has changed since he left. Today the camp continues to help refugees, to provide support programs meant to help unaccompanied minors and women and people of all ages who’ve been traumatized by war and famine. Educational programs have improved significantly since Valentino was a refugee here 16 years ago. (Above: Entrance to the Camp.)

Today there are many more primary schools, secondary schools and youth programs, which are educating thousands of refugees from South Sudan. One of these programs is the Youth and Culture Program that Valentino helped to run when he was there. (Above: A well-known youth dance troupe performs the welcoming dance.) 

Today there are many more primary schools, secondary schools and youth programs, which are educating thousands of refugees from South Sudan. One of these programs is the Youth and Culture Program that Valentino helped to run when he was there. (Above: A well-known youth dance troupe performs the welcoming dance.) 

2017 marks the 25th anniversary of the camp's existence. The refugee arrivals come from 21 countries (versus 8 when Valentino left in 2001). Many were born and raised in the camp. Some have been there for more than 20 years. "It has changed a lot physically.  Temporal programs and structures have become fixed. The Camp is more accessible than it ever was.  But it faces more funding issues than during my time -- especially for food rations," said Valentino. (Above: Valentino with elders discussing community issues.)

2017 marks the 25th anniversary of the camp's existence. The refugee arrivals come from 21 countries (versus 8 when Valentino left in 2001). Many were born and raised in the camp. Some have been there for more than 20 years. "It has changed a lot physically.  Temporal programs and structures have become fixed. The Camp is more accessible than it ever was.  But it faces more funding issues than during my time -- especially for food rations," said Valentino. (Above: Valentino with elders discussing community issues.)

The Youth and Culture Program, which Valentino helped run when he lived there, hosts a variety of sports activities--basketball, soccer, volleyball and the Kakuma Premier League (a popular tournament of Camp soccer teams pictured above.)   

The Youth and Culture Program, which Valentino helped run when he lived there, hosts a variety of sports activities--basketball, soccer, volleyball and the Kakuma Premier League (a popular tournament of Camp soccer teams pictured above.) 
 

Proportionally, there are fewer South Sudanese now (about 70% in 2001 versus less than half today), but with the upsurge in violence and famine, the numbers may increase again. There are also many refugee entrepreneurs, mostly Somalian and Ethiopian, serving the refugees with goods such as food, household items, bicycles and construction materials. (Above: Students from Mogodishu Primary School stay out of the sun.)

Proportionally, there are fewer South Sudanese now (about 70% in 2001 versus less than half today), but with the upsurge in violence and famine, the numbers may increase again. There are also many refugee entrepreneurs, mostly Somalian and Ethiopian, serving the refugees with goods such as food, household items, bicycles and construction materials. (Above: Students from Mogodishu Primary School stay out of the sun.)