TELL CONGRESS: DON'T SLASH FOREIGN AID

A MBSS cook in our storeroom. The funds to buy and transport these bags of grain were privately raised, a $200,000+ challenge we face each year to feed our students and staff; and to run the Scouts' "charity maize program" that distributes food to the sick and the poor. But not everyone in South Sudan is so lucky. Famine has been declared in parts of South Sudan gripped by civil war and economic turmoil. Over 30 million people currently face a man-made food insecurity in the region. US foreign aid is necessary to prevent the famine from spreading by funding agencies such as the UN's World Food Programme and USAID's Food for Peace program. 

A MBSS cook in our storeroom. The funds to buy and transport these bags of grain were privately raised, a $200,000+ challenge we face each year to feed our students and staff; and to run the Scouts' "charity maize program" that distributes food to the sick and the poor. But not everyone in South Sudan is so lucky. Famine has been declared in parts of South Sudan gripped by civil war and economic turmoil. Over 30 million people currently face a man-made food insecurity in the region. US foreign aid is necessary to prevent the famine from spreading by funding agencies such as the UN's World Food Programme and USAID's Food for Peace program. 

 
 

Lifesaving aid is expression of America's interests and values

Steep cuts to United States government foreign aid are a clear statement to the world's most vulnerable: America is not willing to help. President Trump has proposed cutting foreign aid—which funds lifesaving relief during times of disaster and conflict-by up to one-third. The timing of these deep cuts couldn't be worse. Deadly famine that jeopardizes millions of lives in South Sudan. Foreign assistance is needed now more than ever.

Tell Congress that we cannot turn our backs on South Sudan and the 93 million people worldwide in need of desperate humanitarian assistance. Lifesaving foreign aid is an investment in a safer world, well worth the 1 percent of the federal budget it accounts for. Demand that Congress continue the bipartisan tradition of keeping us safe while helping those in desperate need by funding foreign aid.

Phone Calls

Call your representative directly or call the U.S. Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121.

One way to save time and help you make calling Congress a habit is to save legislators' phone numbers in your cell phone.

Writing a Letter or Email

Personal messages from constituents can be a very effective way of communicating with your legislators. Always be sure to include your name and address to make it clear that you live in the relevant district or state. All letters should start with Dear Senator/Representative, and they can be just a few paragraphs about a single issue.

While you can always use information you have found through various sources, you should write your letter in your own words. Include specific information about the bill or program about which you're writing. Details about personal or local impact are very effective. Always be courteous, and be very clear about what action you'd like your legislator to take.

Address your letter as follows:

For Senators

The Honorable (Full Name)
[Room #] [Building Name] Senate Office Building
United States Senate
Washington, D.C. 20510

For Representatives

The Honorable (Full Name) 
[Room #] [Building Name] House Office Building
United States House of Representatives
Washington, D.C. 20515

When writing to the Chair of a Committee or the Speaker of the House, it is appropriate to begin letters with “Dear Mr./Madam Chairman/woman” or “Dear Mr./Madam Speaker.”

For the President of the United States

The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20500
Comment Line: 202-456-1111
Fax: 202-456-2461
Email: president@whitehouse.gov

Due to security concerns, mail delivery to Capitol Hill or the White House can be slow. If you are writing a letter about a pressing issue or upcoming vote, be sure to leave extra time for delivery or send it to their local office. You can also send a letter by email through your legislator’s website.